English Grammar : article, syntax, verbs conjugation, English spelling

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When talking about quantity, or how much there is of something, the two most important words are any and some.

“Any” is generally used to ask if there is more than one of something. This kind of question is a “yes no” question, meaning that the answer is “yes” or “no”:

“Do you have any money?” (No, I don't.) “Are there any apples in the fridge?” (Yes, there are.) “Have you received any calls this morning?” (No, I haven't.) When used along with the negative, “any” means “none”: “No, I don't have any money.” (I have no money.) “No, there aren't any apples in the fridge.” (There are no apples in the fridge.) “Some” can also be used to answer questions about quantity. “Some” generally means more than nothing but less than the maximum amount.

“Some” is an imprecise term: “Do you have any money?” “Yes, I have some.”
“Are there any apples in the fridge?” “Yes, there are some apples in the fridge.” “Some” can also be used to ask questions about quantity. If you use “some” though, you are saying that you think the answer to the question is yes. “Do you have some money?” (I think you do.) “Are there are some apples in the fridge?” (I think there are.) In order to be more precise, you would ask how much or how many: “Do you have any money?” “Yes, I have some.” How much money do you have?” “I have five dollars.”
“Are there any apples in the fridge?” “Yes, there are some apples in the fridge.” How many apples are in the fridge?” “There are three apples in the fridge.”


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