English Grammar : article, syntax, verbs conjugation, English spelling

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When comparing two things, you can say that one thing is more than the other thing, that one thing is less than the other thing, or that the two things are the same. To say that something is more than something else, you can use the following patterns:
  • ADJECTIVE + “ er” + “than” (for adjectives with less than three syllables) “My father is richer than your father.” “This train is slower than the last one.”
  • “more” + ADJECTIVE + “than” (for adjectives with three or more syllables) “John is more intelligent than Bill.” “Melanie is more beautiful than Karen.”
To say that something is “less” than something else, you can use the following patterns:
  • “not as” + ADJECTIVE + “as” “Kevin is not as strong as David.” “Horses are not as smart as pigs.”
  • “less” + ADJECTIVE + “than” “My watch is less expensive than yours.”
To say that something is “more” than something else in a stronger way you use “much” or “a lot” in the following ways: “My father is a lot richer than your father.” “Melanie is much more beautiful than Karen.” To say that two things are the same, you can use the following pattern:
  • “as” + ADJECTIVE/ADVERB + “as” “Darren runs as fast as John.” “The bus is as crowded as the subway.”

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